A visual counter-memory from the Alliance of South Asians Taking Action

By Sunaina Maira, Madihah Akhter, Sabiha Basrai
Essays    Reportage    Marginalia    Interviews    Poetry    Fiction    Videos    Everything   
Interviews

Looking back at 9/11 and the Fall 2011 issue of the Asian American Literary Review

Interviews

“I feel like my writing is always either at a micro-cellular level or a drone level. There’s this constant cycle between being way too close and things feeling surreal, or pulled way out and things also feeling a little surreal.”

Interviews

“What debts—monetary, emotional, filial—did my parents have that I’ve inherited?”

Interviews

The stories in this folio piece together alternate, speculative histories that reflect distinctly queer modes of life: often without a clear resolution, a “moral,” or a sense of “straight” logic

Interviews

“It feels like you have crossed a river you cannot cross back again”

Interviews

On Yuri Kochiyama’s 100th birthday, her granddaughter Akemi Kochiyama reflects on her radical anti-imperialist, anti-racist, and internationalist politic and praxis

Interviews

“The narrative that is built around a particular moment eventually buries the moment itself.”

Interviews

“Together we are as mighty as our ancestors up from the dead.”

Interviews

“As a writer, as someone who reveals their innermost selves linguistically, it’s lonely not to speak the same language as your parents.”

Interviews

Mundane solidarity helped us meet outside of linear time and embrace ourselves as the whole suns we are.

Interviews

“I think if we can hear from each other that being a model minority is not the only way to have value, and that being the good child is not the only way to be a good person, what might that unlock?”

Interviews

“What people say about the patriarchy hurting men is true. Men benefit from it, but it also hurts them.”

Interviews

“I wanted to turn to actual living language—and reveal, through poetry, the contradictions or erasures or sometimes comic possibilities imposed by different texts.”

Interviews

While I was doing witness work around violence, I was also always living in a shadow space where I could be safer, where I could be protected, where I was known, where I could not be misread

Interviews

Atrocities happen all too often in real life, so it’s my hope that people can be less hurt while reading my novels.

Interviews

Life is getting sick and dying. Life is suffering. And that’s ok.

Essays

An interview with the Virginia Poet Laureate on poetry as witness, colonial history’s hauntings, and her longstanding poem-a-day practice

Interviews

“The work of journalism is bound up in paying attention and noticing things. That’s kind of how I go through the world, with an antenna up for the unexpected, the beautiful, or the moving.”

Essays

The investigative journalist and author of the true-crime book The Good Girls in an interview about honor, caste, and patriarchy in India.

Interviews

A dancing partnership blooms into a Bollywood romance.

Interviews

Looking back at 9/11 and the Fall 2011 issue of the Asian American Literary Review

Interviews

“I think if we can hear from each other that being a model minority is not the only way to have value, and that being the good child is not the only way to be a good person, what might that unlock?”

Interviews

“I feel like my writing is always either at a micro-cellular level or a drone level. There’s this constant cycle between being way too close and things feeling surreal, or pulled way out and things also feeling a little surreal.”

Interviews

“What people say about the patriarchy hurting men is true. Men benefit from it, but it also hurts them.”

Interviews

“What debts—monetary, emotional, filial—did my parents have that I’ve inherited?”

Interviews

“I wanted to turn to actual living language—and reveal, through poetry, the contradictions or erasures or sometimes comic possibilities imposed by different texts.”

Interviews

The stories in this folio piece together alternate, speculative histories that reflect distinctly queer modes of life: often without a clear resolution, a “moral,” or a sense of “straight” logic

Interviews

While I was doing witness work around violence, I was also always living in a shadow space where I could be safer, where I could be protected, where I was known, where I could not be misread

Interviews

“It feels like you have crossed a river you cannot cross back again”

Interviews

Atrocities happen all too often in real life, so it’s my hope that people can be less hurt while reading my novels.

Interviews

On Yuri Kochiyama’s 100th birthday, her granddaughter Akemi Kochiyama reflects on her radical anti-imperialist, anti-racist, and internationalist politic and praxis

Interviews

Life is getting sick and dying. Life is suffering. And that’s ok.

Interviews

“The narrative that is built around a particular moment eventually buries the moment itself.”

Essays

An interview with the Virginia Poet Laureate on poetry as witness, colonial history’s hauntings, and her longstanding poem-a-day practice

Interviews

“Together we are as mighty as our ancestors up from the dead.”

Interviews

“The work of journalism is bound up in paying attention and noticing things. That’s kind of how I go through the world, with an antenna up for the unexpected, the beautiful, or the moving.”

Interviews

“As a writer, as someone who reveals their innermost selves linguistically, it’s lonely not to speak the same language as your parents.”

Essays

The investigative journalist and author of the true-crime book The Good Girls in an interview about honor, caste, and patriarchy in India.

Interviews

Mundane solidarity helped us meet outside of linear time and embrace ourselves as the whole suns we are.

Interviews

A dancing partnership blooms into a Bollywood romance.